Foley Law Offices Has Served New England Since 1991

The United States offers a number of programs welcoming visitors from around the world, maintaining a policy of “secure borders and open doors.” Non-immigrant visas stay in a foreign traveler’s passport and allow him or her to visit the United States for a temporary period. While a non-immigrant visa does not guarantee entrance, it does grant you permission to come into a U.S. airport or other port of entry to request entrance from the Department of Homeland Security.

Looking for an attorney for a non-immigrant visa in Boston?

If you are planning a trip to the United States, it is wise to plan ahead by applying for your non-immigrant visa as soon as possible. Do you already have a visa? If so, is important that you make sure that your visa is current and that you do not need to apply for a renewal.

When you are ready to begin the application process, consult the website for the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate nearest to you and learn how to book an appointment and pay any necessary fines. Be aware that this appointment will most likely include a fingerprint scan and an interview. At that time, the official you meet with can explain the process to you and answer any questions you might have about wait time. The waiting period differs according to which consulate or embassy you go to in order to apply.

Types of Non-Immigrant Visas

There are a number of different types of non-immigrant visas available to visitors to the United States. Which visa you will need to apply for will depend on your purpose for traveling to the U.S. When you meet with an official at your nearest U.S. Consulate or U.S. Embassy, they will explain which visa you need. For example, you will need to obtain a B-1 visa if you are an athlete traveling to the U.S. to compete in an amateur or professional sporting event, but if you are a performing athlete or musician then you should obtain an O or P visa. If you are a student enrolled in an academic or vocational school in the U.S., you will need to apply for an F or M visa, while international cultural exchange visitors require a Q visa.

Members of the media need I visas, and professional and specialty employees need H-1B visas. Professionals from Canada and Mexico, however, need TN visas. If you are an immigrant investor, you need an EB-5 visa. If you are only transiting, you will need a C visa, while visitors who are coming for tourist or vacation purposes should apply for a B-2 license. These are just a few examples of the different types of non-immigrant visas in the United States. Consult a Boston immigration lawyer for more information about which visa is the right choice for your particular goals and situation.

Foley Law Offices Helps Immigrants and Visitors in Massachusetts

My name is John Philip Foley, and since I began my private immigration law practice in 1991, I have been able to help countless families and individuals enjoy pleasant, safe, and legal trips to the United States in a variety of capacities. My goal is to smooth the process for you and ensure that you are able to enjoy your visit to the U.S. without experiencing any unnecessary complications or hassle. My firm keeps up to date with all options available to people who want to come to the U.S. For example, I am closely following the development of the comprehensive immigration bill known as the Schumer E-3 Irish Visa Program approved by the U.S. Senate and being considered by the House of Representatives. The bill includes a section that creates 10,500 non-immigrant E-3 visas per year for Irish nationals. These visas would allow eligible recipients and their spouses to work in the U.S. while renewing the visas as necessary.

As the grandson of an Irish immigrant, I look forward to this bill becoming law. According to U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer, a lead author of the bill, the proposal addresses unintended consequences from a 1965 immigration law that inadvertently disadvantaged Irish nationals seeking entry to the U.S. by switching the immigration system to one favoring high-skilled workers and reuniting families; shortly after the bill 1965 act was passed, Irish immigration to the U.S. decreased by approximately one-third. I make sure my team is on top of these kinds of options as they become available so that we can help people achieve their goals of living and working in the U.S.

Non-Immigrant Visa Lawyer in Boston

Searching for an attorney for non-immigrant visas in Boston? My team of experienced paralegals and administrative support staff – in addition to my wide network of associates around the country who specialize in various aspects of immigration law – are here to help you. Whether you are looking to obtain citizenship or naturalization or a non-immigrant visa, I can also help you with the process ahead of you and stand by you every step of the way. I am dedicated to communicating with my clients so that you are always aware of how your case is progressing. Don’t hesitate. Call my Boston office to schedule your meeting today!