USCIS Changes Extension Process

There is news from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) concerning the processing time for an I-751 to remove the conditions on conditional Legal Permanent Residents.

As of today, petitioners who file an I-751 Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence will receive a receipt notice that can be presented with their Permanent Resident/Green Card, as evidence of continued status for 18 months past the expiration date on their Permanent Resident/Green Card.

USCIS is making the change from 12 to 18 months because current processing times for the I-751 have increased over the past year.

Attorney John Foley said “this makes sense.  USCIS isn’t adjudicating I-751 petitions within the one year extension so this gives them more time.”

An I-751 petition is required in marriage cases where the couple has been married for less than two years when the immigrants status is adjusted.  Foley says “it’s still strange because the immigrant is going to prove his or her legal resident status by showing a soon to be or expired Legal Resident/Green card and an 18-month extension that is in the form of a letter.”

Foley says “even if the I-751 petition is not adjudicated during the extension period, the immigrant is still a Legal Resident and, if necessary, they can obtain an additional passport stamp as evidence of their legal status.”

Foley Law Offices also provides letters to clients traveling internationally during the extension period as well as letters to employers concerned about an employee’s legal status.

If you have questions concerning your I-751 petition or any immigration matter, call Foley Law Offices at (617) 973-6448 for a free telephone consultation with an immigration attorney.

Production Problems at USCIS

Beginning today, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (“USCIS”) will begin recalling approximately eight thousand five hundred Permanent Resident Cards (also known as Green Cards) due to production error. The Green Cards were for approved Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence for spouses of U.S. citizens. The cards were printed with an incorrect “Resident Since” date and mailed between February and April 2018.

USCIS will send notices to individuals who received the incorrect Green Cards and to their attorneys of record. The affected individuals should return their incorrect Green Card to USCIS in the provided pre-paid envelope within 20 days of receiving the notice. They may also return their cards to USCIS field offices. USCIS will send replacement Green Cards within fifteen (15) days of receiving the incorrect card.

The recall does not affect these Green Card holders’ status as lawful permanent residents. If affected individuals need to travel internationally or prove their lawful permanent residence while they wait for a replacement card. they may contact the USCIS Contact Center at 800-375-5283 to determine if they need additional proof.

Spouses of U.S, citizens map apply for naturalization after three years of permanent residency and must meet other requirements. The incorrect date on these cards could lead applicants to wait longer than necessary to apply to become U.S. citizens.

Foley Law Offices is checking Green Cards received between February and April to see if any of our clients need to take action. If you have any questions about your Green Card, please call us at (617) 973-6448 for a free telephone consultation.

TPS Designation for El Salvador to End in 2019

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on January 8, 2018  the termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador effective on September 9, 2019.

The termination of TPS for El Salvador is delayed 18 months in order to provide time for individuals with TPS to arrange for their departure or to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible. The delay will also provide the government of El Salvador with time to prepare for the return and reintegration of its citizens.

Approximately 200,000 El Salvadorians are affected by the termination of this designation. The decision to terminate TPS was made after DHS determined the conditions in El Salvador have improved significantly. Based on careful consideration of available information, the Secretary determined that the original conditions caused by the 2001 earthquakes no longer exist.

Like all other delayed-TPS designation terminations, El Salvadorians with TPS will be required to reapply for Employment Authorization Documents in order to legally work in the United States until the end of the respective termination or extension periods.

An immigration attorney in our office can help you today if you have TPS or any questions regarding any changes to the policy. Please call our office to set up a consultation at (617) 973-6448.

USCIS & IMMIGRATION COURT CLOSED TOMORROW (1/4/2018)

All United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)  District 1 offices (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island) and the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR) – Boston Immigration Court will be closed tomorrow, January 4, 2018, due to the inclement weather. USCIS will be reaching out to every applicant (and/or their Attorneys) scheduled for tomorrow to inform them about the closure. EOIR will be all rescheduling hearings affected.  All offices are anticipated to be open regular hours on Friday.

We will continue to monitor the weather and any further office closings. 

 

 

 

 

TPS Designation for Haiti to End in 2019

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on November 20, 2017, the termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Haiti,  effective on July 22, 2019.  This announcement follows then-Secretary Kelly’s announcement in May that the designation would not likely be extended past six months.

The effective date of the termination of TPS for Haiti will be delayed 18 months. This will provide time for individuals with TPS to arrange for their departure or to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible. The delay will also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients.

Approximately 60,000 Haitians are affected by the termination of this designation. The decision to terminate TPS was made after DHS determined the conditions in Haiti have improved significantly. Advocates for Haitians disagree arguing conditions in the island nation haven’t improved nearly enough for Haitians to return home.

Like all other delayed-TPS designation terminations, Haitians with TPS will be required to reapply for Employment Authorization Documents in order to legally work in the United States until the end of the respective termination or extension periods.

An immigration attorney in our office can help you today if you have TPS or any questions regarding any changes to the policy. Please call our office to set up a consultation at (617) 973-6448.

 

 

Temporary Protected Status Updates for Nicaragua and Honduras

Elaine Duke, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security, announced on November 6, 2017, changes to the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program for Nicaragua and Honduras.

What is TPS?

TPS is a temporary status designated by the Secretary of Homeland Security that can be granted to eligible nationals of certain countries, who are already in the United States. It serves to prevent the country’s nationals from returning to conditions in their country that will be unsafe, or in certain circumstances where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately. Eligible individuals without nationality who last resided in the designated country may also be granted TPS.

Nicaragua

Nicaragua was originally designated as part of the program in 1999. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) reviewed the conditions upon which the country’s designation were based and whether those substantial but temporary conditions prevented Nicaragua from adequately handling the return of their nationals.. There was also no request made by the Nicaraguan government to extend the current TPS status. Based on all available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, Acting Secretary Duke determined that those substantial but temporary conditions caused in Nicaragua by Hurricane Mitch no longer exist, and the current TPS designation must be terminated.

The termination of Nicaragua to the TPS program is not immediate. DHS delayed the termination date by twelve months in order to allow a transition for and TPS holders to determine other avenues of relief and alternative lawful immigration status. It will also provide time for Nicaragua to prepare for the return and reintegration of their citizens. TPS for Nicaragua will terminate on January 5, 2019.

Honduras

Regarding Honduras, Acting Secretary Duke concluded that despite receiving input from various sources, additional time is necessary to obtain and properly assess supplemental information pertaining to country conditions in Honduras in order to make a TPS designation determination.  Based on the lack of definitive information regarding conditions on the ground, the Acting Secretary has not made a determination at this time, thereby automatically extending the current TPS designation for Honduras for six months – through July 5, 2018

 Nicaraguans and Hondurans with TPS will be required to reapply for Employment Authorization Documents in order to legally work in the United States until the end of the respective termination or extension periods.

Let an immigration lawyer in our office help you today if you have TPS or any questions regarding any changes to the policy. Please call our office to set up a consultation at (617) 973-6448.

ALERT: DIVERSITY VISA LOTTERY REOPENED, PREVIOUS ENTRIES NOT VALID

The U.S. Department of State (“DOS”) experienced a technical issue this past month on the Diversity Visa lottery and has reopened a new full entry period, starting Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 12:00pm EST and ending Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 12:00p EST.

Here is the official statement from DOS:

“Due to a technical issue, the DV-2019 entry period that began on October 3 has been closed. Entries submitted during October 3-10 are not valid and have been excluded from the system; they will not count as a duplicate entry. The technical issue has been resolved and a new full entry period will begin at noon, U.S. Eastern Daylight Time on Wednesday October 18, 2017 and will run until noon Eastern Standard Time on Wednesday November 22, 2017. Only entries submitted during this period will be accepted and considered for selection in the lottery. Please throw away any confirmation number or other documentation that you have if you submitted an entry during Oct. 3-10.”

All applicants who previously submitted an entry into the diversity visa lottery during the October 3-10 period must RESUBMIT their application in order to be counted for this year’s lottery. The new lottery period will close on Wednesday November 22, 2017 at 12 pm EST.  If you have any questions about the diversity visa lottery or your previous submission, or  want to set up a consultation with an Immigration Lawyer in our Boston office today, please call 617-973-6448.

USCIS changes direct filing addresses for Form I-129 petitions

The U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services ( USCIS) announced on October 12, 2017, a change in the direct filing addresses for certain petitioners of Form I-129, Petitioner for a Nonimmigrant Worker. These changes are important for all Petitioners  and immigration lawyers to note as beginning November 1, 2017, USCIS will reject any Form I-129s filed at the wrong service center. This could be detrimental for any time sensitive cases such extensions and amendments for H-1Bs.

All I-129s must now be filed according to the state where the company or organization’s primary office is located. Previously, all applications were filed based on the address of the beneficiary’s work location.

Additionally, Petitioners located in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Texas will now file Form I-129 at the California Service Center. Previously, Petitioners in these states filed their petitions at the Vermont Service Center.

There are special instructions for certain petitioners of certain visas, so it is always important to check the USCIS website for the correct address. If you have questions or your I-129 is rejected (properly or improperly), please call an immigration lawyer in our office today!

Temporary Protected Status Changes for Sudan & South Sudan

On September 18, 2017, Elaine Duke, acting Secretary of Homeland Security enacted the following changes for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudan and South Sudan.

Sudan

Beginning November 2, 2018, TPS for Sudanese nationals will be terminated. All Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) will be only renewed until TPS for Sudan is terminated on November 2, 2018. TPS termination for Sudan does not affect any other immigration status that an individual received during their time on TPS. USCIS suggests that individuals who are unable to apply for other immigration benefits to prepare and arrange for departure or apply for other eligible immigration benefits before the termination date.

South Sudan

TPS for South Sudan has been extended for 18 months. South Sudanese nationals currently receiving TPS may re-register and renew their EADs before the new expiration date. Currently, EADs will be renewed automatically for 180 days and upon renewal, new EADs for South Sudanese nationals with TPS will have a May 2, 2019 expiration date on their EADs. The status of South Sudan will be re-evaluated at least 60 days before May 2, 2019. After re-evaluation the Secretary of Homeland Security will determine whether or not to renew TPS for South Sudanese individuals.

Let an immigration lawyer in our office help you today if you have TPS or any questions regarding any changes to the policy. Please call our office to set up a consultation at (617) 973-6448.

DHS expansion of social media policy beginning October 18th!

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has expanded its social media policy and as of October 18, 2018 will be collecting “social media handles, aliases, associated identifiable information, and search results” for all immigrants. It is currently unclear as to how DHS will obtain the “search results.”

Furthermore, the Federal Register states that DHS will “update record source categories to include publicly available information obtained from the internet, public records, public institutions, interviewees, commercial data providers, and information obtained and disclosed pursuant to information sharing agreements.”

It is important to note that this new policy could impact anyone who interacts with immigrants on social media such as Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Any conversation or interaction with an immigrant could be subject to surveillance.

We will continue to monitor the above as more information becomes available.

For any questions on how to fill out the DS-160 and DS-260, or any questions regarding the change in policy, please contact one of the immigration lawyers in our office today.